Attend Our Estate Planning Online Masterclass

Get The

Peace Of Mind

You Deserve

What Does the Role of Estate Executor Entail?

Estate Planning For Life's Stages

View of the ozarks in Southwest Missouri
At some point in your life, there’s a good chance you’ll be tasked with acting as the executor of an estate.
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Being named as the executor of a will is an honor and an obligation. However, depending on the size of the estate and your relationship to the deceased, performing the duties of an executor can feel like a second job, says Kiplinger’s recent article entitled “What to Do When You’re the Executor.”

This can be a real challenge for adult children who are responsible for executing the estate of the last surviving parent. These executors are often required to distribute assets among several beneficiaries, sell the family home and look over all the family belongings. If the family is a bit dysfunctional, if it’s a big estate, or if their parents’ estate planning was poor (or nonexistent), it’s even more time-consuming. Let’s look at some basic steps most executors should follow:

Get a dozen copies of the death certificate and file the will. Copies of the death certificate are usually available from the funeral home. You must then file the will and death certificate with the county probate court. If probate is required, you must get a letter from the court, known as a letter of testamentary. This gives you legal authority over the estate.

Assemble your pro team. In most instances, you’ll need an experienced estate planning attorney to help you navigate the probate court. The attorney who helped the decedent draw up his or her will is a good choice, as he or she is most likely familiar with the estate.

Create an inventory of assets. If the deceased didn’t keep good records of bank and brokerage accounts, insurance policies, tax returns, and other documents, you may need to track down some of these accounts.

Protect personal property. If the estate includes a home, the executor is responsible for maintaining the property and paying the mortgage, taxes and insurance until it’s sold.

Set up a separate bank account. An executor will need to pay bills and make deposits on behalf of the estate, so set up a bank account in the name of the decedent’s estate. This will also provide you a record of transactions that will prove useful if anyone challenges your administration of the estate.

Pay the decedent’s debts. This is a crucial action. If the decedent’s unpaid bills and other debts aren’t paid before the estate is distributed to heirs, creditors could sue. The executor is also responsible for filing a state and federal tax return to pay any taxes owed (or claim a refund).

Communicate with the beneficiaries on a regular basis. Don’t leave the heirs in the dark.

Distribute the assets. Finally, you can distribute the assets after all debts are paid, which may first require court approval.

If this sounds like more than you can handle, you can decline to act as an executor. Sometimes that’s the right choice.

Reference: Kiplinger (Oct. 29, 2021) “What to Do When You’re the Executor”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Lawyer, Wills, Probate Court, Inheritance, Asset Protection, Executor, Personal Representative, Letter of Last Instruction, Probate Attorney, Estate Tax, Letter of Testamentary

Subscribe!